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Toilets FAQ

I have a small space. What is the smallest toilet I can get?

Probably the best option, if you're doing a full renovation, is an in-wall toilet system. These have a cistern that fits in between the studs in the wall and only the flush buttons and pan are visible. You also have the choice of back-to-wall or wall hung pans (clean right under the toilet).This is the best space saver as the space the cistern would normally take is eliminated from the room (have a look at our In-Wall Toilet System Builder to see what might suit).

However, if an in-wall cistern is not an option, there are a number of wall facing toilet suites with short projection (wall to front). Just have a look at the specs.

Before you start looking, take a few minutes to measure your bathroom and work through the "How to Plan Your Bathroom" article in our Tips, Tricks and Traps section. This will help you ensure it's not impossible to get off the toilet or that you don't hit your head on a vanity or towel rail when getting up. Also have a look through "More info on toilets" in Product Advice for tech stuff about water entry and traps etc.

An in-wall cistern is, well, in the wall. Can this be a problem?

Some people feel that external/conventional cisterns are better because they are easier to access if anything goes wrong. However, while in-wall cisterns are built into the wall, all servicable components are still fully accessible through the cover plate (buttons).

Also, all our premium options come with a 15 year warranty on the cistern tank and frame, a 3 year warranty on valve products, 1 year warranty on seals and a whopping 25 year spare parts availability guarantee. Have a look at our In-Wall Toilet System Builder to see what might suit.

What is the difference between an S trap and a P trap and what is setout? How does this impact my choice of toilet suite?

The "trap" is the bend in the pipe where the waste goes out of the toilet. It retains some water after flushing causing a seal and preventing sewer gases from entering the building.

An S-trap exits at the bottom of the toilet, and is designed to outlet directly through the floor, where a P-trap exits at the back of the toilet and is designed to outlet through a wall.

The Setout refers to the distance to the centre of the waste outlet. For an S-Trap, the setout is the measurement from the finished wall to the centre of the waste pipe in the floor (modern standards are between 140mm and 165mm). For a P-Trap, the setout is the measurement from the finished floor to the centre of the waste outlet in the wall (the standard is 185mm).

If you are replacing an existing toilet, and do not want to change the plumbing, you will need to ensure that your new toilet will fit the existing plumbing.

If you have a P Trap toilet you should not be too restricted as most P Traps have a standard set out. However, if you have an S trap toilet, you will need to make sure that you have the measurement from the wall to the centre of the trap before you purchase a replacement toilet.

Have a look through "More info on toilets" in Product Advice for more tech stuff about water entry and traps etc.

What is the difference between a back and bottom inlet toilet suite? How does this impact my choice of toilet suite?

The entry (or inlet) is where the water enters the toilet cistern. A bottom entry toilet has a tap on the wall under the cistern, on either the right or left hand side of the toilet, and it connects to the bottom of the cistern. A rear entry toilet connects inside the cistern.

Many of the toilet suites Bathroomware House cassies are universal and can be fitted as back or bottom entry. However, as a general rule, changing the location of the inlet is not as difficult as changing the location of the trap. Bathroomware House recommends that you check your individual situation with your qualified plumber before purchasing your toilet.

Have a look through "More info on toilets" in Product Advice for more tech stuff about water entry and traps etc.

What measurements do I need?

Before you start looking at a replacement toilet, take note of the trap type, setout and water placement.

Trap type - this can be P-trap or S-trap, we say P is for Plaster (out through the wall), and S is for Sewerage (out through the floor).

Setout or offset - The Setout refers to the distance to the centre of the waste outlet. For an S-Trap, the setout is the measurement from the finished wall to the centre of the waste pipe in the floor. Modern standards are between 140mm and 165mm but can be other with optional bends. For a P-Trap, the setout is the measurement from the finished floor to the centre of the waste outlet in the wall (the standard is 185mm).

Water Placement - measure from the centre of the toilet to the centre of the tap and also from the centre of the tap to the floor. As a general rule, changing the location of the water inlet is not as difficult as changing the location of the trap. Bathroomware House recommends that you check your individual situation with your qualified plumber before purchasing your toilet.

What is the setout of my toilet, how do I measure this?

The Setout refers to the distance to the centre of the waste outlet. For an S-Trap, the setout is the measurement from the finished wall to the centre of the waste pipe in the floor (modern standards are between 140mm and 165mm). For a P-Trap, the setout is the measurement from the finished floor to the centre of the waste outlet in the wall (the standard is 185mm).

Have a look through "More info on toilets" in Product Advice for more tech stuff about water entry and traps etc.

What is an S trap and a P trap?

The "trap" is the bend in the pipe where the waste goes out of the toilet. It retains some water after flushing causing a seal and preventing sewer gases from entering the building.

A P-trap (think P is for Plaster) exits at the back of the toilet and is designed to outlet through a wall.

An S-trap (think S is for Sewerage) exits at the bottom of the toilet and is designed to outlet directly through the floor.

Have a look through "More info on toilets" in Product Advice for more tech stuff about water entry and traps etc.

What types of toilets does Bathroomware House sell?

Bathroomware House sells a wide range of toilets including wall facing toilet suites (no pipes to dust at the back), in-wall systems (just the pan and buttons showing), close-coupled suites (cistern sits on pan minimising exposed pipework), disability suites and more specialist suites such as corner and compact systems. Have a look under Product Advice for more detailed info on all toilet types.

How can we stop the toilet seat from slamming?

Most modern toilets come with 'soft close' seats that eliminate the problems related to slamming toilet seats altogether. As well as the noise, slamming can also damage the toilet. With a soft close seat, simply ease the toilet seat forward and the seat closes slowly and quietly. Ahhh, the serenity!

Is there a type of toilet which is particularly water saving?

The amount of water that toilets use can vary from suite to suite. Austalian standards dictate that new toilets being installed must have dual flush with 6 litres or better for full flush and 3 litres or better for half flush.

The Government regulated WELS (Water Efficiency Labelling and Standards) scheme dictates that all toilets must display a water efficiency label which shows a star rating (more stars the better) and water usage for full, half and average flush.

Most suites and cisterns sold on bathroomwarehouse.com.au are WELS 4 star rated with 4.5 litres per full flush and 3.0 litres per half flush, giving a 3.3 litres average flush (average flush is calculated as the avarage of one full flush and four half-flushes). This information is clearly displayed on our website for each toilet.

What is an S trap and a P trap?

The "trap" is the bend in the pipe where the waste goes out of the toilet. It retains some water after flushing causing a seal and preventing sewer gases from entering the building.

A P-trap (think P is for Plaster) exits at the back of the toilet and is designed to outlet through a wall.

An S-trap (think S is for Sewerage) exits at the bottom of the toilet and is designed to outlet directly through the floor.

Have a look through "More info on toilets" in Product Advice for more tech stuff about water entry and traps etc.

Still have questions?

Ph: 1300 788 653

E: help@bathroomwarehouse.com.au